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Uneventful Friday

Friends, Folks tend to complain about the negativity in the news. Some people think that all the stories about lying, stealing, cheating and killing are a sign of the poor health of our society. A perverse urge that draws us to the events in the tabloids and tells of the decline and inevitable doom of civilization. I disagree. Of course, I would prefer that the evil things that are reported hadn’t happened, however, the news is all about the unexpected. In order to be newsworthy, something must be out of the ordinary. Our baseline expectation is for things to be good. There is no novelty when people tell the truth, respect other people’s property, behave honorably and let other people go-on with their lives. Goodness is the norm, and so, we take the good stuff that happens in the world for granted. Evil acts, on the other hand, scare, surprise and scandalize us. And that’s a good thing. Granted, some extraordinary act of kindness will make the news from time-to-time, and I’m glad to …
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The Future of Donuts

Friends, How will our lives be different in ten years? We’ll be older, sure, but what technological breakthroughs will drastically change the way we do things? It seems to me that we are reasonably good at predicting incremental change. When I tell folks bandwidth demands will increase, security needs will be more complex and reliability will be more important, I’m simply projecting longstanding trends. Electronics get smaller, pixel density gets larger and processors get faster. Change is gradual… until it’s not. Although I’m afraid I may not be visionary enough, here are some thoughts of what may be coming. Windowless cars. As our vehicles start to drive themselves and talk to other vehicles, traffic will speed-up and the need to stop (or even slow down) at intersections diminishes. In general, watching this as a hapless passenger is going to be scary, so why not replace the windshield with a screen so we don’t have to watch. These windowless cars would rely on artificial intelligen…

Muffins and Covfefe

Friends, I’m surprised that none of those trolling POTUS over the Covfefe tweet have suggested an acronym-related explanation. After all, he is the commander in chief, and much like telecom, the military is replete with acronyms and abbreviations. Here are some plausible explanations. ·A new top secret chemical weapon, inadvertently referenced due to an innate desire to Brag –it would explain the ensuing “oops” silence. Referenced by its chemical elements: Cobalt Vanadium di-Iron (CoVFeFe or CoVFe2). ·He may have been talking about the border wall: Concrete Obstacle Visioned to Forcefully Exclude Foreign Entry ·It could be that he was contemplating a new shorthand that packs a high concentration of superlatives. Charming Outrageously Very Fabulous Extremely Fantastic Eyepopping (which could be followed by any noun) ·It’s possible he was explaining the rationale for leaving the Paris accord: Climate Optimistic Views Fiercely Avoiding Factual Evidence ·It could also be a new telecom techno…

Designer Donuts

Friends,
A brand is a powerful thing. It succinctly conveys a large range of attributes, often charged with an array of values and emotions. By and large, brands stay within the narrow confines set forth by the company’s primary line of business. Tide, BF Goodrich and Starbucks are all examples of rule-abiding brands. They are well recognized, yet their association is specific to soap, tires and coffee -respectively. Sometimes, brands transcend. These special brands are generally synonymous with an attitude or a lifestyle. Think Harley Davidson clothing or the Ducks Unlimited edition Chevy Silverado. Their initial association with motorcycles and wetland conservation have broadened to appeal to the wannabe outlaw biker and nature-loving outdoorsman respectively. Another iconic brand, Nordstrom’s, is delving beyond their comfort zone to see whether their brand appeal extends outside the proverbial big box. They are venturing into the realm of designer donuts. So, slick your hair with …

It Ain't Over Till It's Over

Friends, When I wrote this week’s Stream post making a shocking admission concerning baseball, little did I know there would be some baseball karma following me around. 6:00 AM, I leave the house bright and early, looking to beat traffic and get the best donut selection at the usual spot. Unbeknownst to me, Holy Donuts closed their doors this week for an unannounced Spring Break. Strike 1! So I decide to drive down to Habit Donuts, after all, it is not a big detour and they have some awesome treats. 6:30 AM, I arrive only to find-out they open at 7:00. Strike 2!! I’m getting a little nervous. I’m downtown, somewhat of a donut desert. Any donut shop I drive to next will be a detour. So I decide to try LaMar’s off of Santa Fe and 6th Ave. (fortunately it’s still early and I’ve got some time). Home run!!! If you decided to brave the elements (it’s really not that bad out there), your courage is about to be rewarded with some delicious deep-fried dough.
Happy Friday!

Companies Begging for Spokepersons

Friends, When you hear certain letter combinations in brand names, do you ever catch yourself thinking of the perfect spokesperson? I must confess this sometimes happens to me. Here are a few that hit me this week: Progressive Insurance – Sean Connery. It’s just the perfect combination of “R” and “S” sounds.Noosa Yoghurt – Jar Jar Binks. Yousa agree?Magoosh Test Prep – Jack Black. Think Kung Fu Panda pinky grip.
As for Holy Donuts, the purveyor of this morning’s treats, I’ve been debating between John Cleese --perfect English accent—and Frances McDonald as Marge Gunderson, the police officer in the movie Fargo –those “O” sounds are just begging to be messed with. Any others come to mind?
Happy Friday!

Donut Inspiration

Friends, People sometimes ask about the writing process for my “donut manifestos”. Many assume I have a dossier of drafts queued-up in cold storage, waiting to be used. Most are surprised to learn I usually write them when I arrive at the office on Friday morning. Granted, I sometimes get an idea early in the week, but, more often than not, inspiration strikes on the drive to work. When it comes to creativity, I think it is good to remain open to ideas. As Mo’at, the sage in James Cameron’s Avatar put it “it’s hard to fill a cup that’s already full”. Remember that meeting where you wanted to sound smart so you neglected to hear what the person preceding you was saying because you were too busy preparing your own statement? Inspiration and writing are often mutually exclusive. Once I start writing, focus demands I shut-out a broad range of new ideas. So, I try to stay open until the last minute and then I decide what to write about. Sounds risky, but I feel it’s the best approach. Sur…