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Thanksgiving boot camp

Dear Members and Constituents,
You may or may not realize there are just under two weeks left until Thanksgiving. You may or may not be asking yourself why you should care. For those of you in the former camp (i.e. those asking yourselves why you should care), I will tell you. If you care, you can prepare!

Let me explain. Of all the pretexts Americans have found to take a day off, Thanksgiving day is the one most characterized by dietary excesses. The problem is the average health-conscious urban professional does not adequately build the stamina for this kind of food overload. To put it bluntly, for most, Thanksgiving day arrives without the appropriate level of physical preparation. Think of a poor soul showing-up to run the Colfax Marathon without any prior training. How do you think they would fare? The sad part is most folks seem surprised when discomfort and drowsiness bring their Thanksgiving day eating binge to a premature end.

Fortunately, time is on our side. Two weeks is adequate time to start a gradual ramp-up in our food consumption leading-up to a stellar performance on T-day. And what better way to begin this regime than by challenging yourself to eat one more donut than your usual allotment today? I know, it may seem like a sacrifice (ok, maybe not), but just imagine the expression on your relatives' faces when you're still sitting at the table long after the Lions have gone to 0-10. Besides, the delicious assortment provided by Roger Greene makes attaining this goal much more rewarding.

Happy Friday!

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