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Trademark, schrademark


Friends,
There’s something amusing about the contempt some Ecuadorian businesses names seem to hold for global trademarks, English grammar and business common sense. Names ranging from the benign GoogleNet café (which, I’m pretty sure holds no affiliation with the search giant) to the meticulously recreated Moe’s tavern from the Simpsons to the eerily macabre SkyNet video service (One wonders whether this would make customers say “I’ll be back” or “hasta la vista baby”). Payless Shoes are alive and well; Circuit City has been resurrected (albeit in a lesser form) and, while I couldn’t find a Best Buy, I thought Best Cell was a rather clever play on the name.

There are also unintentionally funny names. How would you feel about buying bread at the Bony Pan or the Coffee & Pan? (The Spanish word for Bread when combined with an English sounding word makes for cool constructions). How about eating some “brooster” chicken (don’t recognize the word? It’ supposed to be English!). As I departed Ecuador this week, I wanted to make a final stop at the donut king, but, alas, it was closed. I guess I’ll have to settle for Dunkin’.

Happy Friday!
At night, a lifesize statue of Duff Man sits by the entrance
It becomes self-aware at 2:14 AM Eastern Time, August 29th
Welcome to Circuit City!
Best Buy or Cell?
Double O to emphasize the "Oh" sound
Would you like a pan with your coffee?
The Donut King ;-)

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