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Bagel controversy

I have modified the format so you can read it top-to-bottom (I found it annoying to read it bottom-to-top a-la e-mail string)
________________________
[Tucker Maroney]
Anyone interested in making it a donut OR bagel morning? Kinda a pick your poison type thing
________________________
[Kim Carroll]Oh no, Tucker must not remember the huge debate awhile back on this topic J Maybe JP can dredge up the old emails! Personally I really like bagels but I don’t want to mess with the President and get him on my bad side.
________________________
[Yvonne Ng]
I think the last time someone even tried to suggest something like that to JP, he told him/her to "go start their own damn bagel club"…
________________________
[JP Gonzalez]
Tucker,
Enclosed for your reference you will find the e-mail that got this whole donut club started 19 and a half months ago (our carta magna, if you will)

"Here is an idea… Let's have a Friday Donut Club for 31A. You may be asking yourself "What is a Friday donut club? ". It is very simple. Every Friday a different member brings a couple dozen donuts (this number may vary depending on how many people actually warm-up to the idea) and shares them with the rest of the group. Membership is voluntary and open to all donut lovers. One thing to keep in mind is that this will be a donut club, not a bagel club or a cup-cake club… plain and simple, if you don't like it… start your own club ;-). If you want to join, stop by my desk sometime today. I have brought in a couple dozen donuts to help give the club some initial momentum. Drop in even if you don't want to join!
Please forward this e-mail to anyone you think would be interested in participating. I will create a list of everyone who signs-up and assign a rotation schedule. The larger the list, the less frequently you will have to bring donuts in. If you cannot come in, just click on the voting buttons on this e-mail and let me know whether you want to be included on the rotation.
Happy donut Friday!"

I believe introducing Bagels would require a constitutional amendment to the Friday Donut Club charter. While I may entertain the idea of bringing bagels ABOVE AND BEYOND the two dozen donuts you bring in (or any other grain-based products), a minimum of two dozen donuts should always be a part of the mix.
As part of the political process, I suppose the Tucker Maroney Bagel Bill is now open for public comment. Let's hear what folks' opinions are and take it from there.
Best,
-JP
________________________
[Tucker Maroney]
As a representative of the constituents of Tuckerland, I would not be upholding the responsibilities of my office if I did not push this serious issue. Once we have resolution I can start looking for the WMD’s again.

________________________
[Stacey Jackson]
I say Hell YEAH!
JP might need a bigger office – but I’m with him (and Tucker); keep the 24 donuts (bought from a bona-fide donut shop – a debate of another day) and add whatever treats you want.

________________________
[John Schoder]
I say HELL NO!

________________________
[Yvonne Ng]
Hell no from me. We have 6 days a week to eat a bagel and feel healthy, let’s have one day to enjoy, a sweet, sugary glazed donut!

________________________
[Ed Stocker]
Monday morning bagel club? Hmm, that might be an interesting idea to explore.
Bagels on Friday during Doughnut Club? Hell No.
________________________
[Tucker Maroney]
I wonder what will happen if the donuts I bring are not fried, or have sugar on them, and have cream cheese on the side?
________________________
[JP Gonzalez]
Better do that on Monday.

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